Real Estate

Tiny Home Living

We purchased our park model trailer for cash. We could only guesstimate our expenses. Now I can see how much they are. My goal of $860 a month (which I determined back in 2006) was pretty good!

All numbers are per month.

HOA dues = $58.33. This covers sewer, water, use of the lodge, road maintenance, etc.

Electricity = $110 in the winter, $20 in the summer. We use two electric space heaters during the cold months. Looking into a wood burning stove.

Propane = $37.50 for heat and cooking

Gasoline = $30 thanks to driving a Prius

Food = $400 since we dine out a lot and buy from the health food store. Can't grow anything w/o a hoop house.

Insurance (home, auto, health) = $308.33


Easy Estate Planning

The need for a will is becoming less and less. And going thru the probate process may become a thing of the past. Here is what you need to check on:

Brokerage Account:  Transfer on Death (TOD)
A way of designating beneficiaries to receive your assets at the time of your death without having to go through probate. This designation also allows you to specify the percentage of assets each person or entity (your "TOD beneficiary") will receive. Your assets will then be automatically transferred to the designated beneficiaries upon your death.

Bank Account: Payable on Death (POD)
An arrangement between a bank or credit union and a client that designates beneficiaries to receive all the client's assets. The immediate transfer of assets is triggered by the death of the client.

Real Estate: Transfer on Death Deed
When the homeowner dies, title to the real estate passes to the beneficiary or beneficiaries, named in the Transfer-on-Death Deed, similar to how title passes in a Joint Tenancy Deed. This Deed avoids Capital Gains Taxes to be paid by the Beneficiaries at time of sale. Not all states allow them.
If you want to pass property to family members, look into a Quitclaim deed


The Best Bailout Plan Would Have Been To Rescue Homeowners

How? By simply paying off their mortgages. Since 2/3 of GDP is consumer spending, the savings would have gone to buy products/services. That would have kept the unemployment rate from rising.

Here is what my research shows:

The quarterly survey published by the Federal Reserve, called the Flow of Funds Report, shows the total value of all home mortgages in the U.S. was $11.2 trillion through the third quarter of 2008.

According to a team at Bloomberg News, at one point last year the U.S. had lent, spent or guaranteed as much as $12.8 trillion to rescue the economy.

Here is what they did:

$9 trillion given to 8000 banks.